​Texas County Commissioner

What is a County Commissioner?

The county commissioner is responsible for roads and bridges within their precinct and makes policy-making budget decisions. Four commissioners, elected from a quarter of the county's population, serve along with the county judge on the commissioner’s court.

What does a County Commissioner Do in Texas?

A county commissioner in Texas has the following duties:

  • As member of the commissioners court, exercises broad policy-making authority
  • Represents one of four precincts within the county
  • Typically responsible for building and maintaining county roads and bridges within the precinct

Commissioners Court

The commissioners court conducts the general business of the county and consists of the county judge and four commissioners.

The court:

  • Adopts the county’s budget and tax rate
  • Approves all budgeted purchases of the county
  • Fills vacancies in elective and appointive offices
  • Sets all salaries and benefits
  • Has exclusive authority to authorize contracts
  • Provides and maintains all county buildings and facilities

For more complete information about the responsibilties of a county commissioner and other county officials, see the “2018 Guide to Texas Laws for County Officials."

Please note: Some duties performed by officials may vary within individual counties.

County Commissioner Requirements

Commissioners are required to attain 16 hours every 12-month period and may carry forward up to eight hours. Some exceptions apply.

See the full continuing education requirements and more.

County Commissioner Qualifications2

A County Commissioner must meet the following qualifications at the time of appointment or election:

  • U.S. Citizen
  • Resident of Texas for at least 12 consecutive months
  • Resident of the precinct for at least six consecutive months
  • Registered to vote in the commissioners precinct
  • At least 18 years of age
  • Not have been finally convicted of a felony from which they have not been pardoned or otherwise released from the resulting disabilities
  • Not have been determined by a court with probate jurisdiction to be totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote

Candidates for this office generally must meet the above qualifications at the time of filing.

For more information, see the Secretary of State Elections Division website.

Legal Source: Local Government Code Sec. 81.0025, Section (e).


2Vernon’s Ann. Texas Const. Art. 5, §18; V.T.C.A., Election Code §141.001